Plenary Speakers

Ron Brecher, Effective Risk Communication: Making the Science Make Sense

When responding to complex health and environmental risk issues in the public eye, scientists and engineers must communicate effectively with non-technical stakeholders, including decision makers and the people that influence them. Stakeholder concerns can range from health and safety to environmental and economic. Some people may also have questions about accountability, process and fairness. Left unanswered, these concerns can lead to misunderstandings and stakeholder outrage. This in turn can erode credibility not only for the spokesperson, but also for the information, the organization, and the stakeholder engagement process.

This presentation explores some key determinants of communication success, and outlines a framework for planning to communicate. A “Top 10 Tips” approach will be used to give provide practical advice for improving stakeholder understanding, building credibility and preparing to communicate effectively “in the spotlight.”

Click here for more info…

Imogen R. Coe, Equity is the only acceptable goal
Miriam Diamond, A Story of Environmental Science and Regulation in Canada Viewed Through Your Cell Phone

Canada has a long and enviable history of accomplishments in environmental science and translation of that science into environmental protection.  Our notable “firsts” of science followed by evidence-based policies and legislation include acid rain, phosphorus and eutrophication, and persistent organic pollutants (POPs).  However, a globalized economy, the increasing complexity of technologies, and fragmented political discourses present new and difficult challenges for Canadian environmental protection.  These challenges are illustrated through the issue of minimizing adverse effects to humans and the ecosystem from flame retardants (FRs) released from computing system hardware.  This issue, which turns out to be a “wicked” problem, is characterized by multiple disciplinary silos, knowledge gaps, competing priorities and vested interests, the position of the problem between organizational boundaries, the requirement of changing human behavior and economic imperatives, and that solutions can lead to unintended consequences.

FRs are used in virtually all computing system hardware including CPUs and casings (e.g., cell phones, computer cases, printed circuit boards, wiring), but they migrate from their source polymer with disposition in global human and ecosystem populations.  Studies continue to emerge that link exposure to specific FRs with adverse human and ecosystem effects.  The presentation follows now-controlled PBDEs and their organophosphate ester replacements that are used to comply with product-based flammability standards.  These standards are disconnected from efforts to control “problematic” chemicals under the Chemical Management Plan and initiatives such as Extended Producer Responsibility enacted to address the problem of “end-of-life” hardware.  We see that the strengths of the Canadian regulatory regime of being evidence-based and flexible are threatened by societal complexity and vested interests.  At this point, one needs to circle back to the wicked components of the problem in order to clarify potential solutions.

Click here for more info…

 

Abstract Submission: Deadline for abstract submission: 12 May. Extended to 19 May

Please refer to the Call for Abstracts for information on format.

AWARDS

Student Travel Assistance: Deadline for student travel assistance award application: 12 May. Extended to 19 May

Please refer to the Student Travel Assistance Award Form for the required information (must be traveling a distance great than 200 km to attend the meeting).

Best Presentation Awards: Available to Student Members in good standing. Confirm during registration process that you want to be considered.

NEW! Maria Colavecchia-Pfuetzner Memorial Travel Award: Provided to the best overall Student presentation (+ $200 USD top up from SETAC NA) to attend the SETAC NA Meeting. As per SETAC NA rules, award may not be used at a later date.

Registration Fees: (Note: 1-year Membership: Regular $15, Student $6.)

AGM Registration

Until May 12

Before May 26

After May 26

Member

$85

$110 $135

Non-member

$110

$135

$160

Student and Recent Graduate – Member

$60

$80

$100

Student and Recent Graduate – Non-member*

$85 $105

$125

*Please note that only Student Members in good standing will be considered for Laurentian SETAC awards

 

 

Instructor: Dr. Lorna Deeth, University of Guelph, Department of Mathematics and Statistics

Participants learn the basic coding and applications of R and R-Studio for various statistical analyses relevant to biology and toxicology. This course will provide an overview on how to:

1) Utilize R/R-Studio, and gain familiarity with the program environments. This will include an overview of the functions available in the program environment, how to import/export data, how to access help files, etc.

2) Conduct various statistical analyses commonly used in biology and toxicology, ranging from basic statistical techniques through to an introduction in more complex model fitting approaches.

3) An introduction to the use of the R packages “mixtox” and “drc”.

Course content will be demonstrated through interactive demonstrations of relevant statistical analyses. Chapter members working with biological and toxicological assessments will benefit from this workshop.

Participants are reminded to download the R and R-Studio software directly from their respective websites linked below, in order to ensure the most up-to-date version is obtained.

R Logo

R-Studio logo

Instructions for downloading and installing R and R-Studio, as well as installing R packages, are provided in documents loaded into a shareable Google drive, available here:

https://drive.google.com/drive/folders/0B303Wa6DNdeVdjRoeVoyQXZYdjA?usp=sharing

 

Registration: Registration for the Short Course is now openRegister for the Short Course on-line.

Fees for Short Course:

Short Course Registration

Until May 12

Before May 26

After May 26

Member

$85

$110 $135

Non-member

$110

$135

$160

Student and Recent Graduate – Member

$60

$80

$100

Student and Recent Graduate – Non-member

$85 $105

$125

Note that the Short Course fees are not included in the registration fee for the AGM.

 

ACCOMMODATIONS

Affordable accommodations have been blocked at the Oshawa, Residence & Conference Centre on the University of Ontario Institute of Technology main campus, South Village Residence (click here for Campus Map).

Guests can call 905-728-8700 ext 8000 or via email at oshawa@stayrcc.com to confirm a reservation in the group block by quoting group code 2017 Laurentian SETAC. Rooms will be held in the block at the preferred nightly rate of $64.95 + 13% tax until Friday, May 12. After this date rooms are released into general inventory and room availability/rates are subject to what’s left. Included in the rate is parking and wifi for guests.

 

 

Are you interested in becoming a sponsor? You can now submit an online sponsorship form through our website!

Plenary Speaker Biographies

Dr. Ron Brecher

Dr. Ron Brecher

Risk Assessment & Risk Communication Specialist

Dr. Brecher has been a consultant in toxicology and risk assessment since earning his PhD from Sussex University in 1987. He earned his DABT certification in 1991, and has recertified every five years. He is a Chartered Chemist (Ontario). His main areas of specialization are risk assessment and risk communication related to human exposures to chemicals. He is an Adjunct Professor and Associate Graduate Faculty at the University of Guelph.

Dr. Brecher has provided human toxicology, risk assessment and risk communication advice to a variety of governments at all levels in Canada, as well as private sector organizations in Canada and the United States. He has an excellent reputation for communicating effectively with both technical and non-technical audiences. In a facilitator role, he has led multi-stakeholder groups evaluating scientific information to support regulatory decision making.

In addition to his consulting practice, Dr. Brecher provides training in toxicology, risk assessment, risk communication and children’s environmental health to public and private sector clients.

Dr. Imogen R. Coe

Dr. Imogen R. Coe

Dean of the Faculty of Science, Ryerson University

Dr. Imogen R. Coe is the founding Dean of the Faculty of Science at Ryerson University.  She is also a Professor in the Department of Chemistry and Biology and an affiliate scientist in the Li Ka Shing Knowledge Institute, Keenan Research Centre at St. Michael’s Hospital. Dr. Coe is a cell biologist whose research focuses on a group of proteins, known as transporters, that sit in cell membranes and control the uptake of certain naturally occurring chemicals and synthetic drugs used in the treatment of cancer, viral infections and parasitic infections.  Dr. Coe is a vocal advocate for the engagement, retention, recruitment and promotion of girls and women in science and is known as a Canadian thought leader in this area. She has written and spoken on the issue of equity, diversity and inclusivity (EDI) in science, technology, engineering and math (STEM), locally, nationally and internationally, on numerous occasions and in diverse venues. In fall 2016 she was recognized by WXN as one of Canada’s Top 100 Women, in the Trail Blazer category for her advocacy work promoting EDI in STEM.

Dr. Miriam Diamond

Dr. Miriam Diamond

Professor in the Department of Earth Sciences, University of Toronto

Miriam Diamond is a professor in the Department of Earth Sciences with cross-appointments to the Department of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry, the Dalla Lana School of Public Health, School of the Environment, and the Physical and Environmental Sciences Program at Scarborough College.  She received her B.Sc. in Biology from the University of Toronto (1976), M.Sc. from the University of Alberta in Zoology (1980), M.Sc.Eng. from Queen’s University (Kingston, Ontario) in Mining Engineering (1984), and her Ph.D. from the Department of Chemical Engineering and Applied Chemistry from University of Toronto (1990).

The goal of Prof. Diamond’s multidisciplinary research program is to improve our understanding of chemical contaminants from emission, through to transport indoors and outdoors, and ultimately human and ecological exposure.  This research has been published in over 140 articles and chapters in addition to receiving media attention.  Prof. Diamond is an Associate Editor of the journal Environmental Science and Technology, was a member of the Canadian Chemical Management Plan Science Committee, and is a member of the Board of Directors of the Canadian Environmental Law Association.  She is a Fellow of the Canadian Geographical Society and the Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry. In 2007 she was named Canadian Environmental Scientist of the Year.   She was Co-chair of the Ontario Ministry of the Environment’s Toxic Reduction Scientific Expert Panel that helped usher in Ontario’s Toxic Reduction Act.